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Kenneth Craven Bio

Executive, Humanist, Russian Specialist, Intellectual Historian, Psychotherapist

Executive


As a corporate analyst for systemic infrastructure for a quarter of a century, Dr. Craven was influential in the planning and implementation of new infrastructures at AT&T, Xerox, and the City University of New York. In redressing the Western space imbalance following Sputnik in 1957, he was co-director of the Technical Information Project on Wall Street. He created the first schools in information and computer science and developed their doctoral curriculum for a new breed of information scientists at the behest of the Federal Government in cooperation with the Fortune 500 corporations and the National Science Foundation. Earlier in World War II, he served in the U.S. Army Air Force as cryptographer and 2-year station chief at the Net Control Center for the entire China-Burma-India theater in Assam, India.


Humanist


Recognized as one of the ten major scholars on the eighteenth century, English and Russian, Dr. Craven has lectured and published extensively on subjects as diverse as comparative literature, deism and the enlightenment, American colonial history, Catherine II, Freudian and Jungian psychology, publishing history, and the humanities. On faculties at Rutgers, the City College of The City University of New York, and West Virginia University, he taught undergraduate and graduate courses on Shakespeare, the Restoration, the Great Books, the eighteenth century, and the English and Russian novel. He holds B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees from Columbia University.


Russian Specialist


A graduate of Columbia University's Harriman Russian Institute, Dr. Craven is recognized as the only modern scholar to have seen the similarities between Russia and the western world, conditions leading in both to the dystopian information society that he perceives in the future. His insight is highly significant, bearing as it does on intellectual history and the future of the humanities.


Having studied at libraries in Oxford, London, Moscow and St. Petersburg, he has presented papers at international conferences on Russia in Brussels, Budapest, London, Gargnano, New York, Philadelphia, Indiana, and Illinois. He has published articles on Russian consciousness, executive power, publishing, official satire, prose, and poetry.


Intellectual Historian


Dr. Craven has published state-of-the-art essay reviews on comparative literature, eighteenth-century Russian literature, the Enlightenment, and psyche and matter. He has lectured at historical societies in New York, New Jersey and South Carolina on their colonial histories.


"As information processing and transmission are becoming the wave of the future, Craven with his experience, research and writing is definitely the man to undertake the history of information. Craven has thought about the contexts in which the developments occurred, and has seen the interplay of many forces and factors. What he will produce will be, I am sure, exciting, controversial, most educational, also unique, and marketable."

~Richard H. Popkin, UCLA


Psychotherapist


Following eight years of broad spectrum theoretical and clinical training at the American Institute of Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis in New York, Dr. Craven treated patients referred by the Community Guidance Service for obsession, phobias, depression and other stressful presenting problems. An attentive and retentive listener, he succeeded in helping his patients detect and explore both inhibiting and enabling patterns in their lives.


"Beyond the sensitive competence and mature dedication of his work with patients, Dr. Craven demonstrated himself to be a person with extraordinary intellectual and organizational abilities, with a superb sense of the diplomatic in stressful situations. His ability to communicate effectively with people at all levels enables him to use his abilities with particular effectiveness." ~Louis Getoff, Psychoanalyst